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Haiti earthquake

Will TPS For Haiti Be Renewed: Three Things To Know


Image result for save tps haiti images
Seven days. 

The Department of Homeland Security will decide by November 23 whether 59,000 Haitians who benefit from Temporary Protected Status, or TPS, will be allowed to stay in the United States, or will be forced to return to a country that is incapable of taking them back.

Haiti was initially granted TPS in 2010, following a catastrophic earthquake that, according to government figures, killed up to 300,000 people and displaced more than a million.  TPS was reauthorize several times after that, following a record breaking Hurricane and cholera epidemic introduced by UN peacekeepers.  Hurricanes Irma and Maria compounded the damage from all of this.  

Conventional wisdom says that TPS for Haiti won’t be renewed past its expiration on January 22. Here’s why:

Last week DHS declined to extend TPS for Nicaragua, which, like Haiti, is perpetually hammered by natural disasters. In October, the State Department called for an end to TPS in Haiti and several Central American countries.  And last May, then DHS Secretary John Kelly reluctantly granted Haiti a 6 month extension, warning Haitian immigrants to use that time to “handle their affairs,” and arrange departures from the U.S.

A handful of lawmakers from both sides of the aisle who support TPS see where this is headed.  They’ve pressed DHS for an extension, and introduced bills to provide TPS beneficiaries with Permanent Residency and a path to citizenship.  But they’re up against a Trump Administration bent on banning most immigrants from entering the country, and expelling those who are already here.      

I understand it looks bad.  However, none of these factors, definitively at least, closes the door on TPS for Haiti.  To keep things in perspective, here are three things you should know.

1.  Nicaragua Didn’t Comply With The TPS Statute, But Haiti Did

Under the governing statute, TPS is permitted when conditions in an immigrant’s home country make it too dangerous to return.  But in cases that involve an environmental disaster, DHS cannot authorize TPS unless the nation at issue requests it.

Continue reading “Will TPS For Haiti Be Renewed: Three Things To Know”

What is a Disaster Lawyer, Anyway?

I get this question a lot.  For me, it’s someone who uses the law to empower people whose rights are overlooked or outright violated in a disaster.  We advocate for people who were socially vulnerable and politically marginalized even before the disaster, and therefore especially susceptible to human rights abuse after a disaster.

Hurricane Katrina was my first direct experience with a mega-disaster, and it’s important to be clear about what happened. The strength of the storm and where it landed are accepted as reasons so many people died, or struggled to stay afloat in the drawn-out aftermath. But life was fated for people across the Gulf Coast long before Katrina, by government policies that determined who lived where; whether and when they could escape; and if those who made it out were encouraged to return home.  I saw the same thing play out in Haiti, and witnessed it from a distance in the Philippines, Nepal, and virtually everywhere else an earthquake hit, a hurricane struck, or a drought crept in.  The most important thing I learned from Katrina and these other events is that disasters do the most damage along political fault-lines that already exist.

I also learned something else from Katrina.  Continue reading “What is a Disaster Lawyer, Anyway?”

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